Colours

The Queen's Company Colour

The Full Title is 'The Queen's Company Colour, the Royal Standard of the Regiment'.

     
  1 The Colour will be carried only when the Regiment is employed on Ceremonial duties when Her Majesty The Queen is present, and on no other occasion.
  2 If on such occasions the 1st Battalion is detailed to find a Guard of Honour, the Queen's Company will furnish the Guard and will carry the Colour.
  3 If the Regiment is not detailed to furnish the Guard of Honour, and the Queen's Company is not present, the Colour will not be carried.
  4 The Colour will be lowered only to Her Majesty The Queen, HRH The Colonel and Her Majesty The Queen Mother.
  5 By an order from Buckingham Palace, dated 26th October 1937, the Colour is to be lowered on every occasion when The Queen is present, even if the Guard is mounted in honour of some other personage.
When not carried by a Guard of Honour.
  6 When a Guard of Honour is furnished by the Queen's Guard, the Queen's Company Colour will not be carried. The original orders dated 27th October 1902, signed by His Majesty King Edward VII, are preserved at Regimental Headquarters.

Battalion Colours

Each Battalion has two Colours, the Queen's Colour and the Regimental Colour:
       
  1 The Queen's Colours. These Colours (with the exception of the fourth Battalion), are made of Crimson Silk. Each of the Battalion's Colours differ as follows:
       
    a First Battalion. Gules, in the centre the Imperial Crown below this a grenade. The Regiment's Battle Honours are also inscribed.
    b Second Battalion. Gules, in the centre the Royal Cypher proper and reversed interlaced or, ensigned with the Imperial Crown: in the dexter canton the Union Flag of the United Kingdom. A grenade and the Regiment's Battle Honours are also inscribed
    c Third Battalion. Gules, in the centre the Royal Cypher proper and reversed interlaced or, ensigned with the Imperial Crown: in the dexter canton the Union and issuing there from in hand dexter a pile wavy of the second. A grenade and the Regiment's Battle Honours are also inscribed.
    d Fourth Battalion. The Battalion's Colour was presented in 1919. In its original form this Colour was a plain Union Flag. This colour is worthy of special note because:
       
      (1) It is unusual within the Household Division for a Union Flag to be issued as a King's Colour which is contrary to normal practice.
      (2) It had no companion colour.
      (3) It is rare for an additional Battalion, raised in War, to be presented with a Colour.
      (4) The 4th Battalion Colour is now laid up in the Chapel of the Army Training Regiment, Pirbright.
       
  2 Regimental Colours. The Regimental Colours are a Union with a company badge in the centre, surrounded by the Imperial Crown and with below the Company numeral and the grenade fired proper, with the battle honours inscribed and the number of the Battalion in Roman Numerals in the dexter canton. An arrangement that the Company Colours should be borne in rotation on Regimental Colours, was confirmed by a Regimental Order in 1855.
 
 
Old Colours of the 1st Battalion
(Queen's Colour - Left, Regimental Colour - Right)
(Awaiting picture of the New Colours presented by HM THe Queen in May 2010)

 Company Badges

See the Company Badges page.