THE HOUSEHOLD DIVISION

The Household Division comprises seven British Army Regiments serving Her Majesty The Queen.  These are:

  • Household Cavalry (composed of the Life Guards and the Blues and Royals)
  • Foot Guards (composed of the Grenadier Guards, the Coldstream Guards, the Scots Guards, the Irish Guards, and the Welsh Guards)

The Division’s motto is Septem Juncta in Uno (Seven joined in one).

The seven regiments that form the Household Division are units of the regular British army. In 2004, the Minister of Defence announced that the Foot Guards would gain a reserve (or Territorial Army) battalion, the London Regiment. The London Regiment are, however, neither Foot Guards nor household troops. The Household Division and the King’s Troop, Royal Horse Artillery are collectively referred to as the Household Troops. They are under the command of the Major-General Commanding the Household Division, who is also General Officer Commanding London District. From 1950-1968, the term Household Brigade was used.

The connection with the Sovereign remains important ceremonially and operationally, and the Household Division provides both ceremonial and operational support for the Crown. One of the five Foot Guards regiments is selected each year to troop their colour before the Sovereign at Trooping the Colour annually in June. This ceremony includes march-pasts in slow and quick time and is attended by the Household Troops. Orders for the Household Division are conveyed through the Royal Household to the Major General via the Field Officer in Brigade Waiting (for the Foot Guards) and the Silver Stick in Waiting (for the Household Cavalry).

The Household Division provides two battalions and incremental companies at any one time tasked for public duties, which include the protection of the Sovereign. In the event of crisis or war, it is believed that one of these would be responsible for protecting the person of the Sovereign and facilitating his or her evacuation if this were necessary. In the Second World War a special unit, known as Coats Mission, was entrusted with this latter task. In the 1960s, war plans apparently envisaged evacuating the Sovereign to the Royal Yacht Britannia. It would appear that, contrary to a persistent rumour, there were no plans for the Sovereign to join the Prime Minister at the Corsham bunker complex known variously as Hawthorn or Turnstile.

Do you know someone who needs help?

The Household Division Charity has resources set aside for helping with the welfare of serving and retired members of the Household Division and their families too. Recent help has gone to veterans especially those wounded on operations, to widows and to bereaved families including parents and children. If the Household Division Charity cannot help, Headquarters Household Division will provide a link to the Regiments and other charitable organisations.

To request the Household Division Charities help. Please contact:

Major William Style

Telephone Number: +44(0)207 414 2270

Email: treasurer@householddivision.org.uk

The principle application of this welfare support is in maintaining contact and providing enduring access to support when needed. The Household Division Charity Embraces all 7 Regiments of the Household Division,

“Once a Guardsman, always a Guardsman!”

Music is an essential component of ceremonial regimental life in the UK. Each of the five Foot Guards regiments has its own band and its own regimental quick and slow marches. These are on show in the Changing of the Guard ceremony at Buckingham Palace. Similarly, both the Household Cavalry regiments have their own mounted bands and also their own regimental quick and slow marches.

The Massed Bands and Massed Mounted Bands feature annually at Trooping the Colour. The term “Massed Bands” denotes the amalgamated bands of all five Foot Guards regiments and numbers around 250 musicians. The term “Massed Mounted Bands” denotes the amalgamated bands of the two Household Cavalry regiments.

The mounted bands wear colourful state dress and black peaked equestrian caps. They are led by two musicians on large Shire horses used as drum horses. Since their hands are occupied with the drumsticks, they must work horses’ reins with their feet.

The East Kent Branch honour and respect the dedicated service and sacrifice of all service personnel who have served on Operation HERRICK.

We mourn the deaths of all service personnel who have died while serving in Afghanistan since the start of operations in October 2001. A full Roll of Honour can be found on the Ministry of Defence website.

The Ministry of Defence also published casualty figures for Operation HERRICK. These figures were updated monthly, two weeks in arrears.

Household Division Fatalities

This page records the names of those members of the Household Division who sadly find themselves upon those lists:

Lance Corporal Duane Groom, of The Queen’s Company 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 32, born in Suva City, Fiji, was killed in action on Friday 14 September 2012 when his vehicle struck an Improvised Explosive Device in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand Province.

Guardsman Karl Whittle, of The Queen’s Company 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 22, raised in Bristol, died in Queen Elizabeth Hospital on 7 September 2012 having sustained gunshot wounds when his checkpoint was attacked by insurgents in the Nahr-e Saraj District of Helmand Province on 14 August 2012.

Guardsman Jamie Shadrake, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 20 from Wrexham, Wales, died of gunshot wounds on Friday 17 August 2012 when his checkpoint was attacked by insurgents in the Nahr-e Saraj District of Helmand province.

Guardsman Craig Andrew Roderick, aged 22 from Cardiff, and Guardsman Apete Saunikalou Ratumaiyale Tuisovurua, aged 28 from Fiji, both of the 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, who along with Warrant Officer Class 2 Leonard Perran Thomas of the Royal Corps of Signals, were killed on Sunday 1 July 2012 in a small arms fire incident at Checkpoint Kamparack Pul in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand province.

Lance Corporal James Ashworth VC, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 23 from Kettering, was killed in Afghanistan on Wednesday, 13 June 2012. He was the 14th Grenadier Guardsman to have been awarded the Victoria Cross.

Lance Corporal Lee Thomas Davies, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, aged 27 from Carmarthen, who along with Corporal Brent John McCarthy, Royal Air Force, was killed by small arms fire while deployed as part of a Police Advisory Team to attend a meeting at the local Afghan Uniform Police headquarters near Patrol Base Attal in the Lashkar Gah district of Helmand province on Saturday, 12 May 2012.

Guardsman Michael Roland, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 22 from Worthing, was fatally wounded during an exchange of small arms fire whilst deployed with his company on a three-day operation to disrupt insurgent activity in a contested area in the north of Nahr-e Saraj district on Friday, 27 April 2012.

Colour Sergeant Alan Cameron, 1st Battalion Scots Guards, aged 42 from Livingston, Scotland, died on 31 March 2011 as a result of wounds he received in Afghanistan on Wednesday, 13 April 2010.

Major Matthew James Collins, aged 38 from Backwell in Somerset, and Lance Sergeant Mark Terence Burgan, aged 28 from Liverpool, both from 1st Battalion Irish Guards were killed by an improvised explosive device after returning from an operation in support of an Afghan National Army Company alongside C Company of the Danish Battle Group to disrupt insurgent activity and search compounds of interest in the Nahr-e Saraj District of Helmand Province in Afghanistan on Wednesday, 23 March 2011.

Guardsman Christopher Davies, 1st Battalion Irish Guards, aged 22 from St Helens, Merseyside, serving with Combined Force Nahr-e Saraj (North), was killed when he was hit by small arms fire while conducting a patrol in Nahr-e Saraj (North), Helmand province, on Wednesday, 17 November 2010.

Lance Sergeant Dale Alanzo McCallum, 1st Battalion Scots Guards, aged 31 from Hanover, Jamaica, serving as part of Combined Force Lashkar Gah, was killed by small-arms fire in the Lashkar Gah district of Helmand province on Sunday, 1 August 2010.

Lance Corporal Stephen Daniel Monkhouse, 1st Battalion Scots Guards, aged 28 from Greenock, who along with Corporal Matthew James Stenton from The Royal Dragoon Guards, was killed by small arms fire, north of Lashkar Gah Afghanistan, on Wednesday, 21 July 2010.

Guardsman Michael Sweeney, 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, aged 19, from Blyth in Northumberland, was killed as a result of an explosion that happened in the Babaji district of central Helmand province on Thursday, 1 April 2010.

Lance Corporal of Horse Jonathan Woodgate, Household Cavalry Regiment, aged 26, from Lavenham in Suffolk, serving as part of the Brigade Reconnaissance Force, was killed by a grenade attack on the afternoon of Friday, 26 March 2010.

Lance Sergeant David ‘Davey’ Walker, 1st Battalion Scots Guards, aged 36 from Glasgow, was killed as a result of enemy fire in northern Nad’ Ali on 18 February 2010.

Lieutenant Douglas Dalzell, 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, from Berkshire, was killed as a result of an explosion during Operation MOSHTARAK in the Babaji area of Nahr-e-Saraj in central Helmand on Thursday, 18 February 2010.

Lance Sergeant Dave Greenhalgh, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 25 from Ilkeston, Derbyshire, was killed when his vehicle was struck by an improvised explosive device, near Lashkar Gah, Helmand province, on Saturday, 13 February 2010.

Lance Corporal Darren Hicks, 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, aged 29 from Mousehole, Cornwall, was killed as a result of an explosion in the Babaji district of central Helmand province, Afghanistan on Thursday, 11 February 2010.

Acting Sergeant John Paxton Amer, 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, from Sunderland, died from wounds sustained as a result of an explosion that happened in the Babaji area of central Helmand province on 30 November 2009.

Warrant Officer Class 1 Darren Chant, aged 40 from Walthamstow, Sergeant Matthew Telford, aged 37 from Grimsby, and Guardsman James Major, aged 18 from Grimsby, all of the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, along with Acting Corporal Steven Boote and Corporal Nicholas Webster-Smith, both of the Royal Military Police were killed as a result of gunshot wounds sustained in an attack at a police checkpoint in the Nad e-Ali district of Helmand province on Tuesday, 3 November 2009.

Lance Corporal James Hill, 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, aged 23 from Redhill in Surrey, was killed as a result of an explosion near Camp Bastion in Helmand Province on Thursday, 8 October 2009.

Guardsman Jamie Janes, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 20 from Brighton, was killed as a result of an explosion that happened whilst on a foot patrol near to Nad e-Ali district centre in central Helmand province on Monday, 5 October 2009.

Guardsman Christopher King, 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, aged 20 from Birkenhead, near Liverpool, was killed following an improvised explosive device explosion in the Nad e-Ali district, Helmand province, on 22 July 2009.

Lance Corporal Dane Elson, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, aged 22 from Bridgend, was killed in Afghanistan on 5 July 2009.

Lieutenant Colonel Rupert Thorneloe MBE, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, who along with Trooper Joshua Hammond of the 2nd Royal Tank Regiment, was killed by an explosion whilst on convoy along the Shamalan Canal, near Lashkar Gah, in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on Wednesday, 1 July 2009.

Major Sean Birchall, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, aged 33, was killed in by an explosion whilst on patrol in Basharan, near Lashkar Gah, in Helmand province, Afghanistan on 19 June 2009.

Lieutenant Mark Evison, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, aged 26, died of wounds sustained in Afghanistan at Selly Oak Hospital in Birmingham on 12 May 2009.

Lance Sergeant Tobie Fasfous, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, aged 29, was killed in Afghanistan on 28 April 2009.

Trooper James Munday, D Squadron, the Household Cavalry Regiment (HCR), aged 21 from the Birmingham area, was killed in southern Afghanistan on 15 October 2008.

Trooper Ratu Sakeasi Babakobau, Household Cavalry Regiment, aged 29 from Fiji, was killed in Helmand, Afghanistan, on 2 May 2008.

Guardsman David Atherton, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 25 from Manchester, was killed in southern Afghanistan on Thursday, 26 July 2007.

Guardsman Daryl Hickey, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 27 from Birmingham, was killed in southern Afghanistan on Thursday, 12 July 2007. Gdsm Hickey was part of a fire team providing covering fire as others in his platoon assaulted a Taliban position.

Guardsman Neil ‘Tony’ Downes, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 20 from Manchester,  was killed on Saturday, 9 June 2007 when his vehicle was hit by an explosion on a patrol with the Afghan National Army close to the town of Sangin in Helmand province, Afghanistan.

Guardsman Daniel Probyn, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 22 from Tipton, died on Saturday, 26 May 2007 following an overnight operation in Garmsir, southern Afghanistan.

Guardsman Simon Davison, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 22 from Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, was killed by small-arms fire in the town of Garmsir on Thursday, 3 May 2007.

Lance Corporal Sean Tansey, The Life Guards, aged 26 from Washington, Tyne and Wear, was killed in an accident at a UK military base in Northern Helmand province on the afternoon of Saturday, 12 August 2006.

Second Lieutenant Ralph Johnson, Household Cavalry Regiment, aged 24 from Windsor, who along with Captain Alex Eida and Lance Corporal Ross Nicholls, was killed following an incident involving insurgent forces in northern Helmand Province on the morning of Tuesday, 1 August 2006.

It is with very deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has confirmed the following fatalities suffered during Operation TELIC.

A total of 179 British Armed Forces personnel or MOD civilians died serving on Operation TELIC since the start of the campaign in March 2003.

Of these, 136 were killed as a result of hostile action. A full Roll of Honour can be found on the Ministry of Defence website.

43 are known to have died either as a result of illness, non-combat injuries or accidents, or have not yet officially been assigned a cause of death pending the outcome of an investigation.

The balance of these figures may change as inquests are concluded.

The East Kent Branch honour and respect the dedicated service and sacrifice of all service personnel who have served on Op Granby. We also mourn the deaths of all service personnel who have died while serving in Iraq since the start of operations.

This page records the names of those members of the Household Division who sadly find themselves upon that list:

Guardsman Stephen Ferguson, 1st Battalion Scots Guards, aged 31, from Lanarkshire, died in Selly Oak Hospital in the UK on Thursday 13 December 2007 from injuries sustained in a non-battle incident near the Contingency Operating Base in Basra on Wednesday 12 December 2007.

Lance Sergeant Chris Casey, aged 27 from London, and Lance Corporal Kirk Redpath, aged 22 from Romford, both of 1st Battalion Irish Guards, died in southern Iraq on Thursday 9 August 2007.

TROOPING THE COLOUR (2019)

Shot live from Horse Guards Parade in London in 2019, Huw Edwards introduced one of the world’s most esteemed military displays, to celebrate the official birthday of Her Majesty the Queen. That year the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards provided the Escort and their Regimental Colonel, HRH the Duke of York, spoke exclusively to Huw Edwards. Huw was joined by military and royal experts to guide viewers through the meticulous parade, a balcony appearance by the Queen and the royal family, and the traditional RAF flypast.

Air date: Saturday 8 June 2019

Video length 2 hours 34 minutes 53 seconds
(All credit to the BBC and YouTube)

TROOPING THE COLOUR (2020)

Highlights of a special military parade to mark the official birthday of Her Majesty the Queen.

For the first time in her reign, a unique ceremony took place at Windsor Castle after the traditional Trooping the Colour parade on Horse Guards Parade was cancelled because of the coronavirus pandemic.

It was only the second time in her 68-year reign that the parade in London had not gone ahead.

The Queen, flanked by officials, sat alone on a dais for the ceremony. It was her first official public appearance since lockdown began.

Huw Edwards was joined by royal and military experts to introduce the ceremony which was led by the Welsh Guards.

Air date: Saturday 13 June 2020

Video length 1 hours 8 minutes 5 seconds
(All credit to the BBC and YouTube)